Language and IDE

Anything general relating, or not relating to Dusk Tactics. You can even just introduce yourself!
Forum rules
This forum is open to most topics, feel free to discuss anything here.
Post Reply
User avatar
Mithlayh
Novice
Novice
Posts: 7

Tactics

Language and IDE

Post by Mithlayh »

For any programmers, but aimed at game developers,

What are your preferred languages and IDEs?
​​​
I'm quite familiar with C++ and Visual Studio, but I'm trying out IntelliJ and Java. However,  recently several people have suggested that I look into Python.

I've been "testing" out some ideas for an RPG using Javascript and feel I'm ready to get serious. I'm experienced with C++ but really would rather use something different.

User avatar
lou
Journeyman
Journeyman
Posts: 73
Location: USA
Contact:

Tactics

Re: Language and IDE

Post by lou »

For me, it's Java and Eclipse IDE. In High School they taught us C and then moved to C++ but at that time I was already into Java.

I got lucky with Eclipse as it wasn't very popular when I started using it and it really blew up, it always helps to know your away around the IDE you use.

I've used Visual Studio, (I remember using VB6 back in the day too, haha). But ever since they made a version of Visual Studio free I made sure to download it. I mostly use it for C# which is basically Microsoft Java. Yet another language to look into if you want to get away from C++.

It's interesting to hear someone moving away from C++ for gamedev, I know it's become a pretty standardized go-to for gamedev. If you have an interest in easily publishing on consoles, you may want to stick to C++ as it ports to the modern consoles easier than most.

But, depending on the engine you use, you'll still be able to do it. I just know with straight C++, you're pretty much setup and ready to go. I only say this because with Java I would most likely have to port the code or configure some sort of JNI wrapper to run Java in C++ to get the game on a console, at least for now.

I have more experience with PHP than Javascript, and personally I got really used to type safety so these newer languages and their ambiguity have been a bit of a turn off (but even Java has adopted it in Java 10 IIRC, so I'm sort of behind the times), but I can definitely see it being a great direction to go in!

Python has come a long way and is pretty easy to learn, it can be run off of a JVM as well using jython which has been my experience with it.

The language is up to you, whatever feels best!

Since you know C++ it gives you a head start with learning a new language, I'd even go a bit further to say other languages should be easier to learn than C++ in some regards. Having less control over memory was a plus for me, haha, (I can't stand pointers)!

Javascript is an interesting choice, the move by RPG Maker MV to open itself more to scripting puts a lot more power in your hands, you might want to consider trying it if you're looking at making an RPG, it's come a long way!

If you're going for straight Javascript and not just using it as a scripting language then I'm assuming you're going for more of a web-based game. I've heard a lot of good stuff about Phaser and Pixi.js.

Did you have an engine in mind?
Dusk Tactics - http://dusktactics.com

User avatar
Mithlayh
Novice
Novice
Posts: 7

Tactics

Re: Language and IDE

Post by Mithlayh »

I've been using Javascript just to flush out ideas, it's easy and with html5 the gui is basic. I like c++, but it's so much work compared to a lot of languages. Especially memory management.

​​​​

User avatar
Mithlayh
Novice
Novice
Posts: 7

Tactics

Re: Language and IDE

Post by Mithlayh »

I've started looking into Amazon Lumberyard and Unity, but originally I wasn't going to use an engine and just build my own...
Or... what do you mean by engine, exactly?

User avatar
lou
Journeyman
Journeyman
Posts: 73
Location: USA
Contact:

Tactics

Re: Language and IDE

Post by lou »

Sorry I didn't see this until now!

I should have defined it better, I did mean Engine as in Unity, Godot etc, however I proposed libraries previously so I could see that being confusing.

Unity is pretty good, if you have an understanding of core concepts but not much experience in coding/programming I'd highly recommend it. It allows for a visual method of putting things together that is very cool.

At the end of the day whether you code it or drag and drop widgets together, the end result is pretty much the same outside of possible optimizations, but for prototyping Unity, Godot, GameMaker, RPGMaker (for rpgs), are all good choices.

If you do have some experience programming/coding then you might find it a bit off-putting to use a visual engine like Unity, however you can choose to script in C# exclusively and have a similar experience.

When it comes to C++ I feel the same exact way, haha! It's definitely a bit more low level, so you have to choose your priorities.

Definitely prototype using an engine, and then decide from there. I wrote a bit below and it got a little wordy, but I'll keep it for you or anyone else, maybe it can help someone.

--

Below is completely my personal opinion from my experiences, so read it but ultimately you decide how to proceed!

If you take the time to look around the web when thinking of starting game development, you'll see the question of "Should I use a pre-existing engine, or make my own" come up pretty often. In my experience, this is often answered as a stark "DO NOT DO IT".

I understand where this answer is coming from and it's not wrong but at the same time it's not exactly right. I will say that it is good advice for someone who just wants to jump into game development and create a game.

The problem is it can deter those who may have different goals in mind. Before answering one should inquire further! Ask them if their primary focus is to develop a game or if they have other ambitions as well.

If you just want to develop a game, do that using an engine that already exists. However, if you want a bit more control, are interested in systems design, would like to engineer something, or anything outside of just game development then I see no problem making your own engine.

It sounds obvious, but the point is this: creating an engine will be an entire project in and of itself. Depending on the complexity it could take longer than making the game! It will also entail much more engineering, math, wheel reinventing (or re-purposing~) and other work. Basically a lot of non-game development stuff which can lead to getting burned out.

I have a background in application programming and while I knew this going in, 14 months into the project the fact that I had still not done any actual game development was very demotivating.

Months and months later (pretty much now) I am somewhat in the middle of my game developing endeavor and while I don't regret the path I took, the truth is I would be much further along had I used a pre-existing engine.

That being said, the things I learned while making the engine are precious to me and I enjoyed the process for the most part. The challenge of "how do I get this result?" is a very interesting one to me and it might be the same for you. You'll have to face this challenge in game development of course, but at least there it's a bit more focused on game mechanics rather than the general visual/audio stuff.

Personally, one thing I like is being able to fall back on creating an SRPG Maker as I have made an entire suite of tools to help create the game, haha.

It would be an insane amount of work, but it's always good to have backup plans.

And that turned into an essay...

Well if you read it, I hope it helps somewhat~
Dusk Tactics - http://dusktactics.com

User avatar
Mithlayh
Novice
Novice
Posts: 7

Tactics

Re: Language and IDE

Post by Mithlayh »

Yeah I have issues with the visual IDEs, like Unity. I'm much more comfortable with strictly code. I think I have it figured out, I'm going to stick with visual studio, or intelliJ. Right now I'm messing around with C++ and Java mainly.

I have experience with older versions of Game Maker, but haven't touched it since they went to Game Maker Studio. I enjoyed it's setup.

User avatar
chronokatamie3
Novice
Novice
Posts: 1

Re: Language and IDE

Post by chronokatamie3 »

For me, I always use Visual Studio Code as my IDE, and I work in C++ and Python. I really like how fast it is to prototype an idea in Python, but I usually use C++ when it comes to most big projects, just because it's what I'm most familiar with.

Post Reply